America’s Lost Highway-California’s U.S. 99 is now available in Google Maps

Explore what was once the primary north-south route for traveling the length of the state of California with Google Maps, providing the locations of hundreds of landmarks and historic sites along the way.

Links to Google Maps from American Auto Trails

Historical Cities-Atlanta, Georgia is now available in Google Maps

Explore the historical landmarks and sites of the Atlanta Metropolitan area using Google Maps as your guide.

Historical Cities-Atlanta Google Maps

American Auto Trail-North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Parkway is Now Available on Google Maps

Explore 78 Historic Sites, Landmarks, and other Point of Interest along the 252 miles of the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina.

Autotrails.net List of U.S. Google Maps

America’s Lost Highway-Missouri’s U.S. Highway 66 is Now Available on Google Maps

Explore 120 Historical Sites and Landmarks along Route 66 through the Show Me State.

Autotrails.net List of U.S. Google Maps

Historical Cities-Dieppe and Upper Normandy, France is now available on Google Maps

Link to Google Maps

Dieppe is a seaport, fishing harbor, and fashionable watering-place, situated on the English Channel at the mouth of the Arques, between two ranges of chalk cliffs.  The harbor, whence the cross-channel boats ply to Newhaven, is commodious and deep.

Dieppe probably originated in the Gaulish and Roman settlement of the Cite de Limes.  It was colonized in the 10th century by Norse adventurers, to whom it owes its name (in allusion to the depth of the harbor).  The earliest castle here was built by Henry II of England.  Dieppe, like St-Malo, was the home of many corsairs and bold adventurers, whose exploits included the pillaging of Southampton (1339), a blockade of Lisbon (1530), and voyages of discovery to every shore from Iceland to the Gold Coast.

Under Francis I, the port became the most flourishing in France, and the local manufacture of carved ivory from imported tusks dated from this period.  Its large Protestant population suffered by the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, and in 1694 the town was ruthlessly bombarded by the English fleet, which was returning from an unsuccessful attack on Brest, so that it had to be almost entirely rebuilt.  In 1870 and 1871, it was held by the Prussians for seven months.  The harbor was enlarged between 1914 and 1918.  Among celebrated Dieppois are Jean Ango (1480-1551), the corsair and merchant prince; Jean Cousin, one of the claimants to the discovery of Brazil (1488); and Abraham Duquesne (1610-1688), the Calvinist admiral who vanquished De Ruyter of Sicily.

Normandy (French for Normandie), the ancient duchy and province of France, now represented by the departments of the Seine-Inferieure, Eure, Orne, Calvados, and the Manche, owed its early name of Terra Northmannorum or Northmannia to its occupation in the early part of the 10th century by the Norsemen (Normands).  It is one of the most attractive regions of France, with a varied landscape of hedgerows, orchards, cornfields, and pastures, recalling England.  The coast-line is formed by white chalk cliffs, and in the winding dales of the interior are many remains of medieval architecture, village spires and venerable castles and abbeys, some of which were founded in the time of the conquerors of England.  The most picturesque portion is the lower basin of the Seine.  Since the time of their Scandinavian ancestors, whose regular trade was piracy, the Normans have been supposed to possess a somewhat grasping character; and they have been styled ‘the lawyers of France’ from their fondness for legal forms and processes.  At the same time they are tenacious in their French patriotism.  Butter and cheese, the staple products of Normandy, are very largely exported to England.

 

Historical Cities-Dublin, Ireland is now available on Google Maps

Links to Google Map and Companion Text

Historical Cities-Dublin, Ireland provides information about the historic sites and landmarks within the city centre of Dublin and in the surrounding vicinity.  It is not our desire to dramatize the history or expand on it in any way.  We believe that the character and culture of the city can speak for itself.  The guide has been created, not for just travelers new to the city, but for current residents who may not realize what lies just around the corner in their own neighborhood.  This is not intended to be an exhaustive guide to all sites, as the individual traveler will find their own historical treasures amongst the landmarks we present.

Ghost Towns of the West-Rocky Point, MT

Ghost Towns of the West-Rocky Point MT Google Maps

Rocky Point-From U.S. Highway 191, 5.7 miles east on CMR Auto Nature Tour Road, 7.7 miles on local road along north bank of Missouri River.

A. Broadwater, Helena merchant, financier, entrepeneur, was one of the businessmen involved in the Carroll Trail (1872-1874). During its short existence, Broadwater made a trip by horseback from Carroll up river to Fort Benton and overland to Helena. He knew that Rocky Point, two bottoms above Carroll, had an existing ferry, a good solid crossing with north and south travel as well as it was an early woodhawk location. He seized the opportunity to move up to Rocky Point where he built a 2 story, 40′ X 90′ trading post and was awarded a Government contract through his business associate and dear friend, Amhert Wilder of St. Paul, Minnesota. He asked for Cantonment Rocky Point which consisted for 19 infantry men to guard the government freight shipments destined for Fort Maginnis in 1881 as well as mill machinery for the new gold mines at Maiden. Gold had also been discovered in the Little Rockies and some shipments went to the north, which made this a busy river port.

The Military Telegraph line from Fort Buford (North Dakota) via Camp Poplar, Ft. Galpin (near Ft Peck), Hawley, Wilders Landing to Fort Maginnis was completed in 1882 and an office at Rocky Point opened. This line was built by soldiers in three sections.