Forgotten Landmark-Tokio School, Tokio (TX)

Early classes in the Tokio area were held in the ranch house of the J Cross Ranch near the turn of the century. In 1911, a school building was constructed near the center of town and classes were relocated. Larger school buildings later were erected, once due to fire and twice due to changing space needs. The school facilities continued to serve the community’s educational as well as religious and civic needs until 1941 when Tokio School was consolidated with the Brownfield Independent School District.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tokio, also called Wiggins, is at the intersection of Farm roads 1858 and 3149, five miles southwest of West in northern McLennan County. Joseph Thomas Rogers purchased 1,200 acres in the area in 1868. Tokio became a rail stop in 1882, when the Texas Central Railroad was building its track between Ross and Albany. In 1910 the community had a gin, a store, and twenty-five residents. During World War II, the name of the community was changed to Wiggins. In the 1940s, it had a school, a church, a few businesses and residences, and a population of twenty-eight. The school was consolidated with the West Independent School District in 1945. A church and several scattered houses were shown on topographic maps of the area from the 1950s through the 1970s. Though Wiggins was the official name of the community for many years after the end of World War II, the old name for the town eventually came back into local usage. The name Tokio replaced Wiggins on the community list in the Texas Almanac in the late 1980s, but a recent population estimate was not available. (Handbook of Texas Online)

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