Posts Tagged ‘ Auto Trails ’

American Auto Trail-Massachusetts’ U.S. Highway 1 is now available on Google Maps

U.S. Highway 1, the most direct route between Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and Pawtucket, Rhode Island, enters Massachusetts as a concrete road winding through a pleasant countryside bordered by farm land and open fields. South of Newburyport, it is still locally called the Newburyport Turnpike. Built in 1804 as a stagecoach road between Newburyport and Boston, the Turnpike, sometimes called the “airline route,” is unusual among Massachusetts highways in that in 35 miles it deviates only 83 feet from a straight line.  From Newburyport, it runs through rolling country up and down the glacial hills of Topsfield and Danvers.  At Lynnfield, it levels out as it passes Suntaug Lake, swings around its only curve between the red rock outcrops of Saugus.

This free guide and others are available at Auto Trails.net

 

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Historical Cities-Chicago, Illinois is now available on Google Maps

Explore over 70 historical sites and landmarks with accompanying background text through Google Maps.  This guide and others are available at Autotrails.net

American Auto Trail-Kansas’ U.S. Highway 50 is now available on Google Maps

American Auto Trail-Kansas’ U.S. Highway 50 explores the width of the State of Kansas, from Kansas City, Dodge City and on to the Colorado State Line.  Find this guide and others at our website, Auto Trails

Slow Travels-Oatmeal, Texas

Oatmeal, Texas (5.6 miles southwest of Bertram on FM 243)

A German family reportedly named Habermill came into the area in 1849 and spent a season or two in the vicinity of the headspring of the stream now known as Oatmeal Creek. The town name is either an alteration of the name of a Mr. Othneil, who owned the first gristmill in the area, or a supposed translation of the name Habermill (Haber is a German dialect word for Hafer, “oats”). An Oatmeal post office was established in 1853, and the first schoolhouse was built in 1858. A second school, marked by a state historical marker and still used as a church in 1990, was erected in 1869. The first orchard in the county was located in the community, and the first and only cheese press in the county operated there. A gin built by George Naguler in the 1870s served as a local landmark until 1907, and the community at one time had a general store. A cemetery plot was deeded in 1871, though burials had occurred there as early as 1854. After the American Civil War a colony of former slaves settled in the eastern part of Oatmeal. They built homes along a straight lane, constructed a building for use as a church and school, and established the only all-black cemetery in the county. The settlement, known as Stringtown (among other names), ceased to exist by the 1920s. TSHA Online

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elijah Bullion was born Oct. 24, 1809, in Franklin Co., Georgia, and died October 19, 1888, at Oatmeal in Burnet County. He was buried in Oatmeal Cemetery. On January 29, 1839, he was married in Itawamba Co., Mississippi, to Elizabeth Mariah (Betsy) Bumgardner.

 

 

Historical Cities-Atlanta, Georgia is now available in Google Maps

Explore the historical landmarks and sites of the Atlanta Metropolitan area using Google Maps as your guide.

Historical Cities-Atlanta Google Maps

America’s Lost Highway-Missouri’s U.S. Highway 66 is Now Available on Google Maps

Explore 120 Historical Sites and Landmarks along Route 66 through the Show Me State.

Autotrails.net List of U.S. Google Maps

Historical Cities-Dieppe and Upper Normandy, France is now available on Google Maps

Link to Google Maps

Dieppe is a seaport, fishing harbor, and fashionable watering-place, situated on the English Channel at the mouth of the Arques, between two ranges of chalk cliffs.  The harbor, whence the cross-channel boats ply to Newhaven, is commodious and deep.

Dieppe probably originated in the Gaulish and Roman settlement of the Cite de Limes.  It was colonized in the 10th century by Norse adventurers, to whom it owes its name (in allusion to the depth of the harbor).  The earliest castle here was built by Henry II of England.  Dieppe, like St-Malo, was the home of many corsairs and bold adventurers, whose exploits included the pillaging of Southampton (1339), a blockade of Lisbon (1530), and voyages of discovery to every shore from Iceland to the Gold Coast.

Under Francis I, the port became the most flourishing in France, and the local manufacture of carved ivory from imported tusks dated from this period.  Its large Protestant population suffered by the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, and in 1694 the town was ruthlessly bombarded by the English fleet, which was returning from an unsuccessful attack on Brest, so that it had to be almost entirely rebuilt.  In 1870 and 1871, it was held by the Prussians for seven months.  The harbor was enlarged between 1914 and 1918.  Among celebrated Dieppois are Jean Ango (1480-1551), the corsair and merchant prince; Jean Cousin, one of the claimants to the discovery of Brazil (1488); and Abraham Duquesne (1610-1688), the Calvinist admiral who vanquished De Ruyter of Sicily.

Normandy (French for Normandie), the ancient duchy and province of France, now represented by the departments of the Seine-Inferieure, Eure, Orne, Calvados, and the Manche, owed its early name of Terra Northmannorum or Northmannia to its occupation in the early part of the 10th century by the Norsemen (Normands).  It is one of the most attractive regions of France, with a varied landscape of hedgerows, orchards, cornfields, and pastures, recalling England.  The coast-line is formed by white chalk cliffs, and in the winding dales of the interior are many remains of medieval architecture, village spires and venerable castles and abbeys, some of which were founded in the time of the conquerors of England.  The most picturesque portion is the lower basin of the Seine.  Since the time of their Scandinavian ancestors, whose regular trade was piracy, the Normans have been supposed to possess a somewhat grasping character; and they have been styled ‘the lawyers of France’ from their fondness for legal forms and processes.  At the same time they are tenacious in their French patriotism.  Butter and cheese, the staple products of Normandy, are very largely exported to England.