Posts Tagged ‘ historic house ’

Historical Cities-Dublin, Ireland is now available on Google Maps

Links to Google Map and Companion Text

Historical Cities-Dublin, Ireland provides information about the historic sites and landmarks within the city centre of Dublin and in the surrounding vicinity.  It is not our desire to dramatize the history or expand on it in any way.  We believe that the character and culture of the city can speak for itself.  The guide has been created, not for just travelers new to the city, but for current residents who may not realize what lies just around the corner in their own neighborhood.  This is not intended to be an exhaustive guide to all sites, as the individual traveler will find their own historical treasures amongst the landmarks we present.

London Nobody Knows-Now Available on Google Maps

London Nobody Knows provides a listing of 173 historic sites around the city of London.  Most of these sites are ones that are often overlooked by the typical tourist to the city.

Our website below contains a link to the Google Maps page, as well as a link to our guidebook for the sites provided.

https://www.autotrails.net/map-guides/

Historical Cities – Charleston, South Carolina, is now available on Google Maps

Charleston is located on the southern end of ‘The Neck’, a strip of land extending from the Bay north to the crook in the Ashley River.  In Charleston, it was important to live ‘below Broad Street,’ and outsiders believed that to live on, or to claim relationship with one who lives ‘on the Battery,’ is a Charlestonian’s prime distinction.  Where the Ashley River and Cooper River meet to form the waterfront was noted even in Europe for its beauty.  Since the War of 1812, it has been called ‘The Battery.’  The high east seawall was built before 1820 of ballast rocks from trading vessels.  This replaced an earlier wall built of palmetto logs which were swept away in 1804.  Between 1848 and 1852, the south wall was added.

Charles Town, as it was originally called, was settled in 1670 by English pioneers who established themselves on Albemarle Point, westward across the Ashley River from the present location.  Oyster Point was higher and better adapted for defense, and was selected for the site of the ‘great port towne’ laid out in 1672 by instructions of Lord Ashley-Cooper, one of the Lords Proprietors.  The colony, increased in the meantime by settlers from Barbados, England, and Virginia, moved across the river in 1680 and Charles Town became a ‘City-State.’  For many years, its history was the history of South Carolina.  It was the center from which colonization radiated and the capital of the province until 1786, when Columbia was founded for that purpose.  Provision crops, naval stores, and the Indian trade gave the colony its start.  Rice and later indigo brought the settlement its wealth, and Charleston became a flourishing urban center for opulent planters, who maintained ‘county seats’ on Low Country rivers.

The influx of French Huguenots and of French Catholics from Acadia in the late 1600’s gave the city a cosmopolitan atmosphere.  They were followed by the arrival of Scots and South Germans.  In the 1800’s, North Germans and Irish immigrants arrived.  A writer of this last period described Charleston as ‘owned by the Germans, ruled by the Irish, and enjoyed by the Negroes.’  The different races and nationalities represented added breadth as well as variety to spiritual and intellectual life.  A public library, the first in the colonies, was established in 1698.  It was succeeded after its decline by the present Charleston Library Society in 1748.  A free school opened in 1710 and a theater in 1735.  The first newspaper, the South Carolina Weekly Journal, was founded in 1730 by Eleazer Phillips, Jr.  It was followed by the South Carolina Gazette, with Thomas Whitmarsh as editor and printer.  Whitmarsh died of ‘strangers’ (yellow) fever in 1735.  The following year, Benjamin Franklin sent Lewis Timothy, one of his printers, to take charge.  In 1738, Timothy was succeeded by his widow.  Later, her son Peter Timothy assumed the editorship until 1775.  The paper was suspended for two years, only to be revived by Peter’s son, Benjamin Franklin Timothy, as the Gazette of the State of South Carolina.  It continued under that name and management until 1792.  Its successor in 1803 was the Courier, the antecedent of Charleston’s present paper, the News and Courier.

Because if their affiliation with the Mother Country and its traditions, many leading Charlestonians found it difficult to sever their British allegiance at the onset of the American Revolution.  However, the first Provincial Congress of South Carolina, meeting at Charleston in 1775, secured strict loyalty to the American cause from most citizens.  Christopher Gadsden, John Rutledge, Henry and John Laurens, and other local leaders were active in the affairs of the new Nation.  A British attack upon Charlestown on June 28th, 1776, was repulsed by William Moultrie’s brilliant defense of the palmetto fort on Sullivan’s Island.  In 1780, the city fell into the hands of the British and was held for two and a half years.  The relationship of Charlestonians and the enemy was not that of conqueror and conquered.  Even in these circumstances, Charlestown remembered its manners.  It was not until December of 1782, when General Nathaniel Greene and other partisan leaders had cleared the rest of the State, that Charlestown was evacuated by the enemy.  The next year, the city’s name was changed from Charles Town to Charleston.

The post-revolution period was characterized by a vigorous democratic spirit.  With the removal of the capital to Columbia, the planters, lawyers, and merchants of Charleston found their control threatened by the small farmers of the interior.  Realizing a need for a stronger government to protect trade and invested money caused Charleston leaders to join heartily in the support for a new Federal constitution.  Years after the rest of the State had gone over to Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic Party, the city remained stiffly Federalist.  Charleston’s prosperity increased during the great plantation era, and the city became noted in Europe and America as ‘a flourishing capital of wealth and ease.’

The embargo on trade accompanying the War of 1812 was a temporary setback.  When developing transportation deflected commerce to Savannah, however, Charleston launched the bold experiment of that pioneer among early steam railroads, the South Carolina Railroad.  The South Carolina Railroad was built from Charleston to the Savannah River, opposite Augusta, from 1830 to 1833.  Coincident with the construction of the railroad was the establishment of the world’s first department store in a mammoth building at the corner of King Street and Market Street.

Charleston, along with the rest of the State, enthusiastically entered into the War Between the States, hosting the convention that passed the Ordinance of Secession.  The long siege of the city abounded with dramatic incidents.  Beginning with the Union defense of Fort Sumter, the port was constantly active with blockade running.  Submarine warfare was first introduced here in 1863.  After Union General William Tecumseh Sherman had demolished Columbia in February of 1865, Charleston was evacuated.  Sherman had insinuated his intention to destroy Charleston, but later plans turned him in another direction.  Union forces had heavily bombarded the city, however.  Public buildings and homes were badly damaged, particularly in the lower sections.  Charleston was left poverty-stricken.

Charleston return to prosperity was interrupted by the earthquake of 1886.  After the cataclysm, weakened buildings were strengthened with tie rods running between the floors from wall to wall, still visible in surviving brick structures.  Other natural disasters have followed, including tornadoes in 1938 and numerous hurricanes.  Despite Mother Nature, the important shipping trade returned.  In 1880, work began on the construction of jetties with Federal funds.  One jetty extends from Sullivan Island and the other from Morris Island.  This closed all channels except one, causing an increased flow with a consequent increased depth.

Historical Cities-Charleston, South Carolina, now on Google Maps

More guides and eBooks are available at www.autotrails.net and Amazon.com

Historical Cities – Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts, is now available on Google Maps

Although Norsemen, the French explorer Champlain, and the Dutch all are said to have visited Boston harbor, and Captain John Smith left us a map of it, no actual settlement was made until the 1620’s.  Boston’s first settler was William Blackstone, a recluse of scholarly and probably misanthropic mental cast, formerly a clergyman of the Church of England.  He had built himself a hut on the western slope of what is now Beacon Hill, planting his orchard on what later became Boston Common.  At that time, the wilderness occupied the peninsula, which was about one-third the size of today’s Boston peninsula.  Almost an island, it jutted out into the bay, joined to the mainland by a long, narrow neck like the handle of a ladle.  It was a mile wide at its widest, three miles long, and the neck was so narrow and so low that at times it was submerged by the ocean.  Blackstone’s realm was bounded on the west by a mud flat (the Back Bay); on the north by a deep cove (later dammed off to make a mill pond); on the east by a small river which cut off the North End and made an island of it, and by a deep cove (later known as the ‘Town Cove’); and on the south by another deep cove.  Here, the disillusioned clergyman read his books, farmed a little, traded a bit with the Indians, and breathed air uncontaminated by any other white man.

His idyllic solitude was rudely shattered after four or five years, however, by the arrival of John Winthrop with a company of some eight hundred persons who settled in what is now Charlestown.  Their miseries were many.  The water at Charlestown was brackish, and their settlement could not easily be defended against Indian raids.  Blackstone visited them and was melted by the spectacle of their plight.  He invited them to come across to his peninsula and the company eagerly accepted his hospitality.  This occurred in 1630, the year of the birth of Boston.

Winthrop’s settlers called it ‘Trimountain,’ possibly because of three hills later known as Beacon Hill, Copp’s Hill, and Fort Hill.  The first year familiarized the Englishmen and their families with the rigors of the New England climate.  It was too late to plant crops and more than two hundred died of starvation and exposure.  The following spring, a ship laden with provisions, long overdue, dropped anchor in the bay, and a famine was averted.  Fisheries were established, and fir and lumber created an export market.  Within four years, more than four thousand Englishmen had emigrated to Boston and its vicinity.  Twenty villages developed out of the peninsula town to form a Puritan Commonwealth.

The settlement soon became the capital of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, governed by a theocracy which rigidly dictated to citizens in matters of religious dogma and private conduct.  Dissenters were persecuted.  Roger Williams and his Quaker followers were driven out, as were Anabaptists and Antinomians (latter led by indomitable Anne Hutchinson”.  When Quakers returned, they were severely punished.  In 1659 and 1660, three men and one woman were executed on Boston Common for thus offending.  Nevertheless, culture and education were valued by Puritans.  In 1635, General Court established the first free school in Boston.  About the same time, Harvard University was created in nearby Cambridge.

Never much of a farming community, the city prospered greatly as a port and trading center.  In 1631, a Boston-built vessel, the tiny Blessing of the Bay, was launched, and from then on shipbuilding continued as an important industry until the American Civil War era.  After the Stuart restoration in England in 1660, Boston, which had actively sympathized with the regime of Oliver Cromwell, became the scene of monarchical reprisals.  In 1684, the Court of Chancery, sitting in the Town Hall, voided the original colonial charter.  Governor Andros, sent by King James II, established a virtual dictatorship.  He attempted to break down the religious and political monopoly of the Puritans by widening the franchise and establishing the right of free worship.

Boston put on a curtain-raiser to witchcraft hysteria in 1688, but suffered the ravages of the persecution less than neighboring towns.  That was largely because, when an epidemic broke out in full force in 1692, sinister accusations were leveled at the wife of Governor Phipps.  Phipps, naturally enough, thereupon bore down on witch baiters.  By this time, Boston’s population had grown to 7,000.  The city’s trade boomed mightily with the development of the Rum-Slave-Molasses traffic triangle.  By 1666, 300 ships, mostly Boston-owned, piled out of port.  In 1691, a royal governor was sent.  In 1733, the Molasses Act was passed, but the Colonial merchants had virtually free trade until 1764.  That year, Grenville began the vigorous enforcement of the mercantilist measures.  From then on, friction increased rapidly and the Colonies developed a burning sense of grievance.

The Boston Massacre (1770) on King Street (now State) occurred in the shadow of the old State House.  News of the British advance on Lexington and Concord was semaphored to Paul Revere by the glimmer of a lamp which swung from the belfry of the Old North Church.  The rafters of Faneuil Hall rang with the impassioned oratory of champions of liberty.  The Old South Meeting House was the point from which fifty men disguised as Indians rushed to Griffin’s Wharf where British merchantmen rocked idly in the harbor, their holds crammed with East Indian tea (1773).  It was the Boston Tea Party which confronted the British cabinet with the choice of capitulation or force, replied to by the Port Act, which marked the beginning of a policy of coercion and led swiftly to open warfare.  The battle of Bunker Hill in nearby Charlestown was one of the early engagements of the war.  Boston was regarded by the British as a most important objective, and the failure of the siege and the evacuation of the city by the Redcoats was the first serious blow to Tory confidence.

The American Revolution left Boston with its population reduced from 25,000 to 10,000 and its commerce ruined.  The discovery of new trading possibilities in the Orient offered an opportunity which enterprising Yankee merchants were quick to perceive.  The development of the China trade and the exploitation of the Oregon coast rich in sea otters restored Boston to its former eminence.  Wealth poured into the coffers of merchants, traders, and shipmasters.  In 1780, 455 ships from every quarter of the globe docked in Boston Harbor, while 1200 vessels engaged in coastwise traffic out of Boston.

Boston’s maritime prosperity was stimulated by the wars between England and France which followed the accession of Napoleon.  However, the Jefferson Embargo and the War of 1812 seriously crippled the city’s maritime development.  Although she recovered, and the era of the clipper made Massachusetts famous throughout the world, the War of 1812 really marked the beginning of the end of Boston’s maritime supremacy.  Thereafter, manufacturing and industry gradually supplanted commercial interests.

boston_1903            In 1822, Boston became a city.  Railroads were built from 1830 and played an important part in urban development.  The first horse car line, connecting Cambridge and Boston, was built in 1853.  Between 1824 and 1858, the Boston peninsula was enlarged from 783 acres to 1801 acres by cutting down the hills and filling in the Back Bay and the great coves with the excavated gravel as a basis for reclamation.  The Neck, which William Blackstone could not always cross on foot because of the tidewater, was raised and broadened, so that what was once the narrowest part of Boston proper is now the widest.

During the era between the American Revolution and the American Civil War, Boston ideas underwent a parallel transformation from the provincial to the urban.  Stimulated by European currents of thought and the philosophy of the frontier, Boston began to revolt against the theology of Calvin, a revolt typical of the democratic spirit of the nineteenth century.  Unitarianism threatened to dissolve the entire system of Puritan Congregationalism.

Nowhere was the reforming spirit more active than in the anti-slavery movement.  William Lloyd Garrison had no respect for the interests of cotton, whether expounded by planters or manufacturers.  He invaded Boston and founded the Liberator in 1831, and was rewarded in 1835 with physical violence at the hands of a mob partly composed of Boston gentility.  Boston played a less important role in the Civil War than in events preceding it.  Unable to meet the prescribed quota of soldiers by voluntary enlistment, the city fathers first employed the draft in 1863, precipitating the Boston Draft Riots.  The poorer classes, irritated when their rich neighbors purchased immunity from compulsory service for the sum of three hundred dollars, objected so strenuously that the militia was called out to quell the disorders.

Although some Bostonians had indicated a reluctance to support the Northern cause during the war, the celebration of peace left little to be desired.  A coliseum seating 30,000 people was erected near the site of the Copley Plaza Hotel housing an Angel of Peace, thirteen feet high, together with an extinguished torch of war, frescoes, doves, and angels, medallions, emblems and flags, as well as the largest bass drum in the world, constructed for the occasion.  By the end of the nineteenth century, Bostonians could boast of other things in addition to a thriving industry and commerce.  Boston had at least two much-touted claims to fame: John L. Sullivan, the greatest fighter of his time, and the first passenger-car subway in America, a two-mile stretch from Arlington and Boylston Streets to the North Station.  The last horse car was discarded in 1910.  An elevated railroad pushed into the suburb of Forest Hills in 1910.

Historical Cities-Boston and Cambridge, MA on Google Maps

More guides and eBooks are available at www.autotrails.net

 

We Support the Ruskin Historical Society, Ruskin (FL)

Today there is a new need for us to come together: to save Ruskin’s future by working to save Ruskin’s past. The Ruskin History Project wants to save local historic buildings from destruction and return them to productive use for the benefit of the entire community.

Ruskin Woman’s Club celebrates 100 years of community service with a display at the Tampa Bay History Center, March 2012

Visit the Ruskin History Center when you are in town.

Below are links to all our online resources.

Forgotten Landmark-Goodholm House, Oklahoma City (OK)

Andrew Goodholm House, 10735 NE 23rd Street, Oklahoma City, OK (Satellite image accessed from Google Maps 1/21/2012)

Construction was started in 1899 by Andrew Goodholm, one of the first millers in Oklahoma City. He was also a city councilman, builder, developer, lumber dealer and an officer of the first packing plant. Goodholm was organizer of the Acme Milling Company, an early flour mill, and headed a company that built the original Sears Roebuck & Company store which has been demolished by urban renewal. As a director of the Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce, Goodholm had a hand in early development of several industries in the city and state. He served two terms on the City Council.

Goodholm’s house later was acquired by another builder, the late Manzy Leon Jones, whose general construction company erected a number of residences and commercial buildings in Oklahoma City. Jones and his wife, Gracelyne, owned the house from 1955 until it was sold in 1977 to Fentriss Sound Company.

James Fentriss was eager to have the house preserved and offered it to any group which agreed to move and restore it to its original splendor.  In the event there were no takers, the building was to be razed to make room for commercial development. Sandy Saunders, State Fair President, proposed moving the house to the Fairgrounds for preservation and to illustrate an example of life in the Capitol City at the turn of the century. Other uses for the house included a museum, teaching tool for children in history, and the creation of a preservation laboratory in conjunction with the Preservation Office of the Oklahoma Historical Society. The house was moved from the State Fair Park in 2008 to this location in Nicoma Park.

National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form

National Register of Historic Places, picture taken in 1982 when located at State Fair Park

Historic Hotel-Morton Mansion Bed and Breakfast, Douglas (WY)

This residence was constructed in 1903 by John
and Sarah Morton, owners of one of the largest ranches in Wyoming.

 

http://www.mortonmansion.com/