Posts Tagged ‘ historic landmark ’

Historical Cities-Chicago, Illinois is now available on Google Maps

Explore over 70 historical sites and landmarks with accompanying background text through Google Maps.  This guide and others are available at Autotrails.net

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America’s Lost Highway-California’s U.S. 99 is now available in Google Maps

Explore what was once the primary north-south route for traveling the length of the state of California with Google Maps, providing the locations of hundreds of landmarks and historic sites along the way.

Links to Google Maps from American Auto Trails

Historical Cities-Atlanta, Georgia is now available in Google Maps

Explore the historical landmarks and sites of the Atlanta Metropolitan area using Google Maps as your guide.

Historical Cities-Atlanta Google Maps

American Auto Trail-North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Parkway is Now Available on Google Maps

Explore 78 Historic Sites, Landmarks, and other Point of Interest along the 252 miles of the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina.

Autotrails.net List of U.S. Google Maps

America’s Lost Highway-Missouri’s U.S. Highway 66 is Now Available on Google Maps

Explore 120 Historical Sites and Landmarks along Route 66 through the Show Me State.

Autotrails.net List of U.S. Google Maps

Ghost Towns of the West-Rocky Point, MT

Ghost Towns of the West-Rocky Point MT Google Maps

Rocky Point-From U.S. Highway 191, 5.7 miles east on CMR Auto Nature Tour Road, 7.7 miles on local road along north bank of Missouri River.

A. Broadwater, Helena merchant, financier, entrepeneur, was one of the businessmen involved in the Carroll Trail (1872-1874). During its short existence, Broadwater made a trip by horseback from Carroll up river to Fort Benton and overland to Helena. He knew that Rocky Point, two bottoms above Carroll, had an existing ferry, a good solid crossing with north and south travel as well as it was an early woodhawk location. He seized the opportunity to move up to Rocky Point where he built a 2 story, 40′ X 90′ trading post and was awarded a Government contract through his business associate and dear friend, Amhert Wilder of St. Paul, Minnesota. He asked for Cantonment Rocky Point which consisted for 19 infantry men to guard the government freight shipments destined for Fort Maginnis in 1881 as well as mill machinery for the new gold mines at Maiden. Gold had also been discovered in the Little Rockies and some shipments went to the north, which made this a busy river port.

The Military Telegraph line from Fort Buford (North Dakota) via Camp Poplar, Ft. Galpin (near Ft Peck), Hawley, Wilders Landing to Fort Maginnis was completed in 1882 and an office at Rocky Point opened. This line was built by soldiers in three sections.

American Auto Trail-Wyoming’s U.S. Highway 30-Now Available in Google Maps

American Auto Trail-Wyoming’s U.S. Highway 30

U.S. Highway 30, originally known as the Lincoln Highway, crosses the rolling prairies and deserts of southern Wyoming, with heavily timbered, snowcapped mountains in view nearly all the way.   Although it reaches its greatest altitude (8,835 feet) near Laramie and crosses the Continental Divide at Creston, it offers easy grades, with little mountain driving.  The route connects several of the largest towns in Wyoming, yet has vast stretches where no dwelling is seen for many miles.  Long freight trains chuff over glistening rails near the highway, and streamlined expresses slither swiftly through the sage, making bright orange streaks across the dead brown and gray-green plain, which sometimes sweeps unbroken from one blue barrier to another.

In October of 1913, the Lincoln Highway was proclaimed to be the nation’s first transcontinental highway and covered 3,300 miles through gravel, mud, and sand.  Across Wyoming it followed the right-of-ways abandoned by the Union Pacific Railroad in 1901.  Many towns were already established along the railroad, and within each of those towns up sprang filling stations, hotels, cabins, and cafes.  However, one should not be confused by highway names such as the Lincoln Highway, Highway 30, and Interstate 80.  In 1926, U.S. Highway 30 was built along the same route of the Lincoln Highway, but a much straighter route resulted.  Interstate 80 furthered those changes along the same route.