Posts Tagged ‘ historic sites ’

Historical Cities-Atlanta, Georgia is now available in Google Maps

Explore the historical landmarks and sites of the Atlanta Metropolitan area using Google Maps as your guide.

Historical Cities-Atlanta Google Maps

American Auto Trail-North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Parkway is Now Available on Google Maps

Explore 78 Historic Sites, Landmarks, and other Point of Interest along the 252 miles of the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina.

Autotrails.net List of U.S. Google Maps

Historical Cities-Dieppe and Upper Normandy, France is now available on Google Maps

Link to Google Maps

Dieppe is a seaport, fishing harbor, and fashionable watering-place, situated on the English Channel at the mouth of the Arques, between two ranges of chalk cliffs.  The harbor, whence the cross-channel boats ply to Newhaven, is commodious and deep.

Dieppe probably originated in the Gaulish and Roman settlement of the Cite de Limes.  It was colonized in the 10th century by Norse adventurers, to whom it owes its name (in allusion to the depth of the harbor).  The earliest castle here was built by Henry II of England.  Dieppe, like St-Malo, was the home of many corsairs and bold adventurers, whose exploits included the pillaging of Southampton (1339), a blockade of Lisbon (1530), and voyages of discovery to every shore from Iceland to the Gold Coast.

Under Francis I, the port became the most flourishing in France, and the local manufacture of carved ivory from imported tusks dated from this period.  Its large Protestant population suffered by the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, and in 1694 the town was ruthlessly bombarded by the English fleet, which was returning from an unsuccessful attack on Brest, so that it had to be almost entirely rebuilt.  In 1870 and 1871, it was held by the Prussians for seven months.  The harbor was enlarged between 1914 and 1918.  Among celebrated Dieppois are Jean Ango (1480-1551), the corsair and merchant prince; Jean Cousin, one of the claimants to the discovery of Brazil (1488); and Abraham Duquesne (1610-1688), the Calvinist admiral who vanquished De Ruyter of Sicily.

Normandy (French for Normandie), the ancient duchy and province of France, now represented by the departments of the Seine-Inferieure, Eure, Orne, Calvados, and the Manche, owed its early name of Terra Northmannorum or Northmannia to its occupation in the early part of the 10th century by the Norsemen (Normands).  It is one of the most attractive regions of France, with a varied landscape of hedgerows, orchards, cornfields, and pastures, recalling England.  The coast-line is formed by white chalk cliffs, and in the winding dales of the interior are many remains of medieval architecture, village spires and venerable castles and abbeys, some of which were founded in the time of the conquerors of England.  The most picturesque portion is the lower basin of the Seine.  Since the time of their Scandinavian ancestors, whose regular trade was piracy, the Normans have been supposed to possess a somewhat grasping character; and they have been styled ‘the lawyers of France’ from their fondness for legal forms and processes.  At the same time they are tenacious in their French patriotism.  Butter and cheese, the staple products of Normandy, are very largely exported to England.

 

Historical Cities-Dublin, Ireland is now available on Google Maps

Links to Google Map and Companion Text

Historical Cities-Dublin, Ireland provides information about the historic sites and landmarks within the city centre of Dublin and in the surrounding vicinity.  It is not our desire to dramatize the history or expand on it in any way.  We believe that the character and culture of the city can speak for itself.  The guide has been created, not for just travelers new to the city, but for current residents who may not realize what lies just around the corner in their own neighborhood.  This is not intended to be an exhaustive guide to all sites, as the individual traveler will find their own historical treasures amongst the landmarks we present.

Ghost Towns of the West-Rocky Point, MT

Ghost Towns of the West-Rocky Point MT Google Maps

Rocky Point-From U.S. Highway 191, 5.7 miles east on CMR Auto Nature Tour Road, 7.7 miles on local road along north bank of Missouri River.

A. Broadwater, Helena merchant, financier, entrepeneur, was one of the businessmen involved in the Carroll Trail (1872-1874). During its short existence, Broadwater made a trip by horseback from Carroll up river to Fort Benton and overland to Helena. He knew that Rocky Point, two bottoms above Carroll, had an existing ferry, a good solid crossing with north and south travel as well as it was an early woodhawk location. He seized the opportunity to move up to Rocky Point where he built a 2 story, 40′ X 90′ trading post and was awarded a Government contract through his business associate and dear friend, Amhert Wilder of St. Paul, Minnesota. He asked for Cantonment Rocky Point which consisted for 19 infantry men to guard the government freight shipments destined for Fort Maginnis in 1881 as well as mill machinery for the new gold mines at Maiden. Gold had also been discovered in the Little Rockies and some shipments went to the north, which made this a busy river port.

The Military Telegraph line from Fort Buford (North Dakota) via Camp Poplar, Ft. Galpin (near Ft Peck), Hawley, Wilders Landing to Fort Maginnis was completed in 1882 and an office at Rocky Point opened. This line was built by soldiers in three sections.

London Nobody Knows-Now Available on Google Maps

London Nobody Knows provides a listing of 173 historic sites around the city of London.  Most of these sites are ones that are often overlooked by the typical tourist to the city.

Our website below contains a link to the Google Maps page, as well as a link to our guidebook for the sites provided.

https://www.autotrails.net/map-guides/

Historical Cities – Charleston, South Carolina, is now available on Google Maps

Charleston is located on the southern end of ‘The Neck’, a strip of land extending from the Bay north to the crook in the Ashley River.  In Charleston, it was important to live ‘below Broad Street,’ and outsiders believed that to live on, or to claim relationship with one who lives ‘on the Battery,’ is a Charlestonian’s prime distinction.  Where the Ashley River and Cooper River meet to form the waterfront was noted even in Europe for its beauty.  Since the War of 1812, it has been called ‘The Battery.’  The high east seawall was built before 1820 of ballast rocks from trading vessels.  This replaced an earlier wall built of palmetto logs which were swept away in 1804.  Between 1848 and 1852, the south wall was added.

Charles Town, as it was originally called, was settled in 1670 by English pioneers who established themselves on Albemarle Point, westward across the Ashley River from the present location.  Oyster Point was higher and better adapted for defense, and was selected for the site of the ‘great port towne’ laid out in 1672 by instructions of Lord Ashley-Cooper, one of the Lords Proprietors.  The colony, increased in the meantime by settlers from Barbados, England, and Virginia, moved across the river in 1680 and Charles Town became a ‘City-State.’  For many years, its history was the history of South Carolina.  It was the center from which colonization radiated and the capital of the province until 1786, when Columbia was founded for that purpose.  Provision crops, naval stores, and the Indian trade gave the colony its start.  Rice and later indigo brought the settlement its wealth, and Charleston became a flourishing urban center for opulent planters, who maintained ‘county seats’ on Low Country rivers.

The influx of French Huguenots and of French Catholics from Acadia in the late 1600’s gave the city a cosmopolitan atmosphere.  They were followed by the arrival of Scots and South Germans.  In the 1800’s, North Germans and Irish immigrants arrived.  A writer of this last period described Charleston as ‘owned by the Germans, ruled by the Irish, and enjoyed by the Negroes.’  The different races and nationalities represented added breadth as well as variety to spiritual and intellectual life.  A public library, the first in the colonies, was established in 1698.  It was succeeded after its decline by the present Charleston Library Society in 1748.  A free school opened in 1710 and a theater in 1735.  The first newspaper, the South Carolina Weekly Journal, was founded in 1730 by Eleazer Phillips, Jr.  It was followed by the South Carolina Gazette, with Thomas Whitmarsh as editor and printer.  Whitmarsh died of ‘strangers’ (yellow) fever in 1735.  The following year, Benjamin Franklin sent Lewis Timothy, one of his printers, to take charge.  In 1738, Timothy was succeeded by his widow.  Later, her son Peter Timothy assumed the editorship until 1775.  The paper was suspended for two years, only to be revived by Peter’s son, Benjamin Franklin Timothy, as the Gazette of the State of South Carolina.  It continued under that name and management until 1792.  Its successor in 1803 was the Courier, the antecedent of Charleston’s present paper, the News and Courier.

Because if their affiliation with the Mother Country and its traditions, many leading Charlestonians found it difficult to sever their British allegiance at the onset of the American Revolution.  However, the first Provincial Congress of South Carolina, meeting at Charleston in 1775, secured strict loyalty to the American cause from most citizens.  Christopher Gadsden, John Rutledge, Henry and John Laurens, and other local leaders were active in the affairs of the new Nation.  A British attack upon Charlestown on June 28th, 1776, was repulsed by William Moultrie’s brilliant defense of the palmetto fort on Sullivan’s Island.  In 1780, the city fell into the hands of the British and was held for two and a half years.  The relationship of Charlestonians and the enemy was not that of conqueror and conquered.  Even in these circumstances, Charlestown remembered its manners.  It was not until December of 1782, when General Nathaniel Greene and other partisan leaders had cleared the rest of the State, that Charlestown was evacuated by the enemy.  The next year, the city’s name was changed from Charles Town to Charleston.

The post-revolution period was characterized by a vigorous democratic spirit.  With the removal of the capital to Columbia, the planters, lawyers, and merchants of Charleston found their control threatened by the small farmers of the interior.  Realizing a need for a stronger government to protect trade and invested money caused Charleston leaders to join heartily in the support for a new Federal constitution.  Years after the rest of the State had gone over to Thomas Jefferson’s Democratic Party, the city remained stiffly Federalist.  Charleston’s prosperity increased during the great plantation era, and the city became noted in Europe and America as ‘a flourishing capital of wealth and ease.’

The embargo on trade accompanying the War of 1812 was a temporary setback.  When developing transportation deflected commerce to Savannah, however, Charleston launched the bold experiment of that pioneer among early steam railroads, the South Carolina Railroad.  The South Carolina Railroad was built from Charleston to the Savannah River, opposite Augusta, from 1830 to 1833.  Coincident with the construction of the railroad was the establishment of the world’s first department store in a mammoth building at the corner of King Street and Market Street.

Charleston, along with the rest of the State, enthusiastically entered into the War Between the States, hosting the convention that passed the Ordinance of Secession.  The long siege of the city abounded with dramatic incidents.  Beginning with the Union defense of Fort Sumter, the port was constantly active with blockade running.  Submarine warfare was first introduced here in 1863.  After Union General William Tecumseh Sherman had demolished Columbia in February of 1865, Charleston was evacuated.  Sherman had insinuated his intention to destroy Charleston, but later plans turned him in another direction.  Union forces had heavily bombarded the city, however.  Public buildings and homes were badly damaged, particularly in the lower sections.  Charleston was left poverty-stricken.

Charleston return to prosperity was interrupted by the earthquake of 1886.  After the cataclysm, weakened buildings were strengthened with tie rods running between the floors from wall to wall, still visible in surviving brick structures.  Other natural disasters have followed, including tornadoes in 1938 and numerous hurricanes.  Despite Mother Nature, the important shipping trade returned.  In 1880, work began on the construction of jetties with Federal funds.  One jetty extends from Sullivan Island and the other from Morris Island.  This closed all channels except one, causing an increased flow with a consequent increased depth.

Historical Cities-Charleston, South Carolina, now on Google Maps

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