Posts Tagged ‘ lincoln highway ’

American Auto Trail-Utah’s U.S. Highway 50 is now available on Google Maps

U.S. Highway 50 feels its way over a plateau region, past billowing foothills sparsely covered with sagebrush
and cacti, through winding canyons, and across clay flats. The colorful Book and Brown Cliffs hem the highway on the
north while the canyons of the Colorado River are glimpsed across the barren wasteland to the south. Between Green
River and Woodside, the San Rafael Swell is blackly silhouetted against the southern sky. West of Woodside, the highway
penetrates Utah’s fuel center, and the settlements draw closer together; thousands of tons of coal are shipped daily
from these mines. Mining towns straggle over the mountainsides between Price and Soldier Summit. West of Soldier
Summit, the road gradually loses the accompanying red sandstone formations, and picks up the gray-white limestone of
canyons flanking the highway to Spanish Fork. Between Spanish Fork and Salt Lake City, U.S. Highway 50, united with
U.S. Highway 91, skirts the western slopes of the Wasatch Mountains, and west of Salt Lake City, united much of the
way with U.S. Highway 40, the route penetrates smelting towns and crosses the Great Salt Lake Desert.

Google Map Guides at Auto Trails.net

 

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American Auto Trail-Wyoming’s U.S. Highway 30-Now Available in Google Maps

American Auto Trail-Wyoming’s U.S. Highway 30

U.S. Highway 30, originally known as the Lincoln Highway, crosses the rolling prairies and deserts of southern Wyoming, with heavily timbered, snowcapped mountains in view nearly all the way.   Although it reaches its greatest altitude (8,835 feet) near Laramie and crosses the Continental Divide at Creston, it offers easy grades, with little mountain driving.  The route connects several of the largest towns in Wyoming, yet has vast stretches where no dwelling is seen for many miles.  Long freight trains chuff over glistening rails near the highway, and streamlined expresses slither swiftly through the sage, making bright orange streaks across the dead brown and gray-green plain, which sometimes sweeps unbroken from one blue barrier to another.

In October of 1913, the Lincoln Highway was proclaimed to be the nation’s first transcontinental highway and covered 3,300 miles through gravel, mud, and sand.  Across Wyoming it followed the right-of-ways abandoned by the Union Pacific Railroad in 1901.  Many towns were already established along the railroad, and within each of those towns up sprang filling stations, hotels, cabins, and cafes.  However, one should not be confused by highway names such as the Lincoln Highway, Highway 30, and Interstate 80.  In 1926, U.S. Highway 30 was built along the same route of the Lincoln Highway, but a much straighter route resulted.  Interstate 80 furthered those changes along the same route.