Posts Tagged ‘ savannah ’

Historical Cities – Savannah, Georgia now in Google Maps

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Google Map Guide to Savannah

The most heavily traveled road in Colonial America passed through here, linking areas from the Great Lakes to Georgia. It was laid on animal trails and Native American trading and warrior paths. Treaties among the Governors of New York, Pennsylvania and Virginia and nineteen chiefs of the Iroquois League of Five Nations in 1685 and 1722 opened the colonial backcountry for peaceful settlement and colonization in Georgia. The Indian Path had two branches from Carolina, the western branch to Augusta and the eastern to Savannah, formed to find salt and game. This later became part of Great Philadelphia Wagon Road. 

 

The plan of Savannah was based on a sketch in Villas of the Ancients by Robert Castell, who died in one of the English debtor prisons that Georgia was founded to relieve. From this sketch, James Edward Oglethorpe, founder of the city, and Colonel William Bull, the leading engineer of the Carolina colony, designed Savannah on a plan to which later builders have adhered. After the landing of the first settlers on February 12th, 1733, Oglethorpe began to lay out the town on a square tract of 15,360 acres to accommodate 240 families. He named the town Savannah, which is believed to be derived from the Sawana or Shawnee Indians, who once inhabited the river valley. Because the Spanish word sabana means flat country, some historians declare that this term was applied to the entire coastal plain by Spanish explorers who preceded the English settlers by two centuries.

 

Savannah became the seat of government when Georgia was made a Royal Province in 1754, and two decades of commercial growth and improved trading conditions followed. At the beginning of the American Revolution, the town had many unyielding Loyalists, but the hot-headed younger men set up a liberty pole before Tondee’s Tavern, shouted approval of the Lexington victory, and organized a battalion headed by Colonel Lachlan McIntosh. When two British war vessels and a transport anchored off Tybee Island, at the mouth of the Savannah River, in January of 1776, the Royal Governor, Sir James Wright (1714-1786), escaped on one of them to Halifax, Nova Scotia. The signing of the Declaration of Independence was celebrated riotously, and in the following year Savannah became the capital of the new state. On December 27th, 1778, Colonel Sir Archibald Campbell landed 2,000 British troops a few miles down the river to besiege the town, which was defended by General Robert Howe and 600 men. Failing to guard a passage through the surrounding marshes, Howe, on December 29th, lost the town and more than half of his men. For this, he was court-martialed and forever divested of military prestige. Following the British occupation, Governor Wright returned. In September of 1779, a long siege was begun by Count d’Estaing’s French fleet, assisted by American forces under the leadership of General Benjamin Lincoln. Their grand assault of October 9th, however, was a disastrous failure, with more than 1,000 casualties. It was not until 1782, when General “Mad Anthony” Wayne’s American forces struck, that the British at last evacuated the city.

 

After the Revolution, there was another period of expansion. The city’s first playhouse was built in 1785. The city was incorporated in 1789, and after Eli Whitney’s invention of the gin four years later it sprang into eminence as a cotton center. Tobacco, shipped down the river from Augusta, made Savannah a market for this commodity. The growth of surrounding plantations and the disposal of Indian lands were other factors in its expansion. 

 

For the defense of the city during the War of 1812, Fort Wayne was strengthened, and Fort Jackson was built two miles downstream. In May of 1814, the U.S. sloop Peacock captured the British warship Epervier, brought it into the harbor, and confiscated $10,000 in specie aboard the British ship. The half century following the War of 1812 was an era of rapid development in transportation. In 1816, the steamboat Enterprise carried a Savannah party upstream to Augusta.

 

In 1819, maritime history was made when on May 22nd, 1819; the City of Savannah was the first steamship to cross the Atlantic, sailing into Liverpool, England. The successful use of steam in coastwise vessels inspired William Scarborough and several Savannah merchants to organize the Savannah Steamship Company which was formed on December 19th, 1818. The Savannah, equipped with adjustable paddle wheels, was constructed at Corlear’s Hook, New York, and reached Savannah on March 28th, 1819. President James Monroe made a trip to Tybee aboard this vessel. After arriving in Liverpool, the steamship continued on to St. Petersburg, Russia and then returned home. So expensive was this expedition that its sponsors declared the vessel impracticable for commercial purposes, and it was converted into a sailing packet that plied the coast of the United States until it was lost off Long Island in 1822. In the National Museum in Washington D.C. are the log book and a cylinder of this ship, in honor of which President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1935 proclaimed May 22nd as National Maritime Day. 

 

To lower transportation costs between the Savannah and Ogeechee rivers, the Ogeechee Canal was opened in 1828. In 1843, the Central of Georgia Railway was completed from Savannah to Macon. During this period, Savannah, because of its harbor, was the greatest port on the southern seaboard for cotton and naval stores.

 

The Mexican War of 1846 brought prominence to two Savannah men. Colonel Henry R. Jackson (1820-1898), later minister to Austria and to Mexico, served as commander of Georgia’s regiment. Josiah Tattnall (1796-1871) distinguished himself at Vera Cruz in command of the Mosquito Division of the United States Navy. During the period prior to the War Between the States, Savannah developed a sectionalism that made it respond instantly to the war cry in December, 1860. Now there were no Whigs and Tories to divide the city. Upon adoption of the Ordinance of Secession, Savannah men seized Fort Jackson, and in March of 1861, the Confederate flag floated over the customhouse. On April 10th, 1862, the 400 defenders of Fort Pulaski, occupied before secession by order of the fiery Governor Joseph E. Brown, were forced to surrender to Union soldiers. Although Fort Pulaski became a Union military prison, Savannah itself did not fall until 1864, when Union General William Tecumseh Sherman marched through Georgia to the coast. On December 13th, Sherman took Fort McAllister and on the 17th, demanded the surrender of Savannah. Confederate General W.J. Hardee and his 10,000 troops continued to skirmish three days longer before they evacuated the city by means of a new pontoon bridge to Hutchinson Island. On December 21st, 1864, Union troops occupied Savannah. 

 

With the abolition of slavery and the collapse of the great plantations, the port ceased to function. But for all the poverty of Reconstruction and an appalling yellow fever epidemic in 1876, there was progress. With the establishment of the Naval Stores Exchange in 1882, Savannah became the leading turpentine and rosin port. During the First World War, boom prices caused shipyards to be hastily built along the waterfront, but a cataclysmic fall in business followed the boll weevil’s destruction of cotton in 1921. By 1926, control of the cotton pest had caused the port to regain much of its former activity. 

 

Along Bull Street, which forms the central axis of the city, are five squares that, in the original city plan, were designed as centers of defense against Spanish and Indian invasion. With all its commercial and cultural successes, Savannah gains its individual charm from its atmosphere of the past. 

Updated Catalogue of eBooks (.epub, .pdf, etc)

Historical Cities-Minneapolis & St. Paul, Minnesota
Ebook Price: $1.99 USD. 17100 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on January 12, 2011
This edition in the Historical Cities series explores the twin cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. From the early days of the Native American, French, and Scandinavian settlers to the growth in the early part of the last century, this guide explores the historic sites and landmarks of both cities. Reference maps and GPS coordinates for all listed sites are included.

Slow Travels-Tennessee
Ebook Price: $1.99 USD. 101790 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on January 7, 2011
This is the Tennessee edition of the Slow Travels series. U.S. Highways 11, 25, 31, and 70 are followed through the State, examining a cross-section for Tennessee and providing a wealth of historical information along the way. Reference maps and GPS coordinates for all listed points of interest are included.

Slow Travels-Kentucky
Ebook Price: $2.99 USD. 82220 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on December 17, 2010
This edition in the Slow Travels series explores U.S. Highways 25 (Covington to Tenn Line), 31W (Louisville to Tenn Line), 41 (Ohio River near Owensboro to Tenn Line), and 68 (Maysville, KY to Paducah). Over 450 Historic sites and landmarks are described along these routes, and reference maps and GPS coordinates for all listed sites are included.

Historical Cities-Los Angeles
Ebook Price: $1.99 USD. 48320 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on December 13, 2010
This edition of our Historical Cities series explores the city and county of Los Angeles, including the surrounding environs of Beverly Hills, Hollywood, Santa Monica, Long Beach, San Pedro, and Pasadena. Over 230 historical sites and landmarks are provided with historical background and GPS coordinates. Reference maps provide simple navigation aids.

Historical Cities-Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Ebook Price: $2.99 USD. 54040 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on November 16, 2010
This edition of the Historical Cities series explores Philadelphia, the birthplace of the United States. Over 200 historical sites and landmarks are provided for walking tours of the city center and in the surrounding districts. Text is based on the work of the Federal Works Project of the 1930’s and 40’s. All sites have been verified and located with GPS coordinates.

Slow Travels-Mississippi
Ebook Price: $2.99 USD. 63960 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on November 8, 2010
Slow Travels-Mississippi explores the history of the state along U.S. Highways 45, 61, 80, 82, and 84. Based on the American Guides Series of the 1930’s and 40’s, this guide includes up to date directions, reference maps, and GPS coordinates for all listed sites. Explore Vicksburg, Natchez, Jackson, and all the history inbetween.

Slow Travels-Arkansas
Ebook Price: $2.99 USD. 47890 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on October 18, 2010
This edition explores the State of Arkansas, retracing U.S. Highways 61, 67, 70, 71, and 79 throughout the state. Each highway includes historic sites and landmarks, background information combed from the American Guide Series of the 1940’s updated for the present-day traveler, reference maps, and GPS coordinates for all listed sites.

Historical Cities-New York City
Ebook Price: $2.99 USD. 64750 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on October 8, 2010
This edition of the series explores the boroughs of New York City: Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, and Staten Island. Over 600 historical sites are described within, based on the WPA 1939 Guide to New York City. Along with historical text of each site, borough histories, reference maps, and GPS Coordinates are included. Travelers and residents alike will find enjoyment and education.

Historical Cities-San Antonio, Texas
Ebook Price: $0.99 USD. 7870 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on August 28, 2010
The San Antonio edition of Historical Cities explores the multi-national past of this south Texas city. Fifty-one historic sites and landmarks in the city’s downtown and surrounding area are explored. A concise history is also provided. Reference maps for the downtown and San Antonio’s environs are included, along with GPS coordinates for all listed historic sites.

Slow Travels-Louisiana
Ebook Price: $1.99 USD. 66960 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on August 22, 2010
This version of Slow Travels-Louisiana takes the driver on an historical journey through Louisiana. U.S. 61 follows the Great River Road from Miss. to New Orleans, U.S. 80 retraces the Vicksburg, Shreveport, & Pacific Railroad from Vicksburg to the Texas Line, U.S. 84 explores the old Texas Road from Natchez to Logansport, and U.S. 90 retraces the Old Spanish Trail through Southern Louisiana.

Slow Travels-Nevada
Ebook Price: $1.49 USD. 69880 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on August 14, 2010
Slow Travels-Nevada explores the historic sites along the routes of U.S. Highways 6, 40, 50, 93, and 95 through the Silver State. Based on the American Guide Series of the 1930’s and 40’s, these sites include abandoned mining camps, scenic rivers and canyons, as well as the cities of Reno and Las Vegas. Reference maps and GPS coordinates are included.

Slow Travels-California
Ebook Price: $1.99 USD. 101950 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on July 25, 2010
The updated version of Slow Travels-California explores this State’s history along the present and previous routes of U.S. Highways 40, 50, 60, 99, and 395. Come explore the rich and varied history of the Golden State. This guide provides in-depth information about historic sites, landmarks, and legends along California’s highways. Maps and GPS Coordinates for listed sites are included.

Historical Cities-Savannah, Georgia
Ebook Price: $1.49 USD. 7460 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on July 2, 2010
Historical Cities-Savannah explores the rich history of Savannah, Georgia, and over 45 historic sites and landmarks within the city. A walkable map is included, as well as GPS coordinates for all listed historic sites. The history of Savannah and the background information for each site are based on the American Guides of the 1930’s and 40’s.

Historical Cities-Baltimore, Maryland
Ebook Price: $0.99 USD. 8680 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on July 2, 2010
Historical Cities-Baltimore explores the history of Baltimore and over 50 of its historic sites. The background text is based on the American Guides of the 1930’s and 40’s. Guide maps are provided for walking and driving tours, and GPS coordinates for listed historic sites are also included.

Slow Travels-Virginia
Ebook Price: $1.99 USD. 128720 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on June 19, 2010
This guide explores Virginia and its history on U.S. Highways 11, 15, 17, 50, and 60, as well as the Blue Ridge Parkway and Skyline Drive. Historical text for each site and landmark along the highways are derived from the American Guides of the 1930’s and 40’s. Reference maps and GPS Coordinates for all listed sites are included.

Slow Travels-Blue Ridge Parkway
Ebook Price: $1.99 USD. 19090 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on June 14, 2010
This edition of the Slow Travels Series commemorates the 75th Anniversary of the beginning of the Blue Ridge Parkway construction. The segments of the parkway are separated into the Virginia and North Carolina sections. This guide is not intended to be a history of the Blue Ridge Parkway, but a guide to the history which lies along it and in the surrounding region.

Slow Travels-Georgia
Ebook Price: $1.99 USD. 158630 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on June 4, 2010
U.S. Highways 17, 23, 41, and 27 travel the state from north to south, and U.S. 80 and 84 explore from the Atlantic to the Alabama State Line. Along these highways, historic sites and landmarks are laid out for the leisure driver to enjoy. Entertaining and educational, these guides are for both the individual traveler and the entire family. Maps and GPS Coordinates are provided.

Slow Travels-Florida
Ebook Price: $1.99 USD. 82120 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on May 30, 2010
This edition of Slow Travels follows U.S. Highways 1, 27, 90, and 301 through the State, examining a cross-section of Florida and providing a wealth of historical information along the way. Also included is U.S. Highway 41 along the Tamiami Trail. Maps provide a reference guide, and GPS Coordinates are listed at the end of each route. Look for others in the series at http://www.americanautotrails.com.

Slow Travels-South Carolina
Ebook Price: $1.99 USD. 43190 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on May 16, 2010
This installment of the Slow Travels series explores the Palmetto State of South Carolina. The routes followed in this exploration are U.S. Highways 17, 25, 52, and 178. From the Atlantic Coast, including Charleston, Myrtle Beach, Beaufort, and Hilton Head, to the Cherokee Piedmont on the North Carolina State Line, South Carolina’s history is unveiled along these routes.

American Auto Trails-South Carolina’s U.S. Highways 25 and 178
Ebook Price: $0.99 USD. 20260 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on May 8, 2010
This edition in the American Auto Trails series explores U.S. Highways 25 and 178 through the western side of South Carolina, from the Cherokee Foothills along the North Carolina Line to the Low Country along the Savannah River. Driving Maps as well as GPS Coordinates for all listed Historic Sites are included.

Slow Travels-North Carolina
Ebook Price: $1.99 USD. 60130 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on April 30, 2010
This edition of Slow Travels explores North Carolina. U.S. 1 hosts from Virginia, through Raleigh to Rockingham. U.S. 17 parallels the Atlantic through the state’s Albemarle to Cape Fear. U.S. 52 bisects the state from the upper Piedmont to the Pee Dee River. U.S. 70 travels from the Atlantic to the Blue Ridge. Finally, the Blue Ridge Parkway travels the crest of the Appalachians.

American Auto Trail-North Carolina’s U.S. Highway 1
Ebook Price: $0.99 USD. 8930 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on April 29, 2010
This edition of the American Auto Trails series explores U.S. Highway 1, America’s Main Street, as it crosses the state of North Carolina from north to south. Along its journey, it passes through the capital of Raleigh and past the industrial mines which produced coal and gold. A Driving Map and GPS Coordinates for all listed historic sites are included.

American Auto Trail-North Carolina’s U.S. Highway 17
Ebook Price: $0.99 USD. 15830 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on April 29, 2010
This edition of the American Auto Trails series travels the Ocean Highway, as U.S. 17 is also known as, through the Albemarle region of North Carolina, inland of the Outer Banks and Albemarle Sound. This territory is rich in American Colonial history, with many references to the sailing trade which once flourished here. A Driving Map and a list of GPS Coordinates for all listed historic sites.

American Auto Trail-North Carolina’s U.S. Highway 70
Ebook Price: $0.99 USD. 22190 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on April 29, 2010
This edition in the American Auto Trails series explores the route of U.S. 70 across North Carolina, from the coastal town of Atlantic to the Smoky Mountains on the Tennessee State Line. U.S. 70 travels through the heart of the state, connecting the cities of Raleigh, Durham, Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and Asheville. Driving maps and GPS Coordinates are provided for all listed historic sites.

Historical Cities-New Orleans, Louisiana
Ebook Price: $0.99 USD. 4890 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on April 25, 2010
This edition in the Historical Cities series explores the French Quarter and surrounding area of New Orleans. Simple to use maps provide make a walking tour of the city’s historic sites entertaining and educational. GPS coordinates are provided for the more tech savvy user. More than 50 sites are identified, with text backgrounds based on the 1930’s and 40’s American Guide Series.

Historical Cities-Boston, Massachusetts
Ebook Price: $0.99 USD. 10290 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on April 24, 2010
This guide contains historical sites and landmarks for the city of Boston, as well as the adjacent Cambridge and Charlestown areas. It is not intended to be all inclusive, although future editions will follow with additional listings. In all, close to 90 sites are listed within this guide, along with detailed maps to assist in locating them. At the back of the guide is a table of GPS coordinates.

Historical Cities-San Francisco, California
Ebook Price: $0.99 USD. 6950 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on April 23, 2010
This edition in the Historical Cities series explores landmarks and sites within the city of San Francisco. Over 50 sites are divided into the east and west side of the northern end of the Peninsula. Maps and GPS coordinates are included.

Historical Cities-Providence, Rhode Island
Ebook Price: $0.99 USD. 11840 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on April 23, 2010
This edition of the Historical Cities series explores the many historical sites and landmarks of Providence, Rhode Island.Over 85 historical buildings, sites, houses, and other landmarks are described with detailed backgrounds and easy-to-use walking and driving maps. GPS coordinates are also provided for the more tech savvy traveler. Historical information is based on the American Guide Series.

Historical Cities-Charleston, South Carolina
Ebook Price: $0.99 USD. 6060 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on April 23, 2010
The proverbial powder keg of the American Civil War, Charleston also claims a rich history reaching back to the early days of the American colonies and beyond. Descriptions are derived from the extensive information provided in the American Guide Series of the 1930’s and 1940’s, and GPS coordinates are located at the end of the guide for the more technically proficient.

Historical Cities-Chicago, Illinois
Ebook Price: $0.99 USD. 14570 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on April 23, 2010
This installment in the Historical Cities series explores the varied ethnic and industrial history of Chicago. Over 70 historical points of interest are described, in the Loop as well as the North, West, and South Sides. Historical backgrounds are based on the American Guides series of the 1930’s and 40’s. GPS coordinates are provided for those who would like to plan out their own tour.

Historical Cities-Newport, Rhode Island
Ebook Price: $0.99 USD. 17870 words. Non-Fiction by Lyn Wilkerson on April 20, 2010
This edition in the Historical Cities series explores the colonial seaport of Newport, Rhode Island. Over 75 historical sites and landmarks are identified with historic backgrounds and maps providing easy navigation to each site, by both on foot and by car.